Element Information•○

Name; Aluminum Boron○•
Address; 313 Street Blvd.
Date of Birth; July 14th, 1825
City/State/Zip; Las Vegas, Nevada, 70017
Country; USA
Gender; Metal

Just a little info;
In my free time I collect pop tabs from soda cans and create crafts out of them.
My favorite drink is Pepsi, Dr. Pepper, Fanta, and Mountain Dew, basically anything that is in a can.

My favorite movie, and novel, is "Rancid Aluminum". Best comedy you'll ever see~

Number of protons~ 13
Number of neutrons~ 13
Number of electrons~ 14
Number of valence electrons~ 3

Family History•○
Family Name; Boron
Siblings; Boron, Gallium, Indium, Thallium

One big happy family! ^_^

We are all~
• nonmagnetic
• sparkling
• lighweight
• bendable
• durable

Lewis Structure (Electron Dot)•○


Aluminum has 3 valence electrons.
Aluminum has 3 valence electrons.


Covalent Bonding - What is covalent bonding?
~ Covalent bonding is where you attempt to get to elements with electrons that will form a perfect outer circle; either 2 or 8.
~ They can only be done with nonmetal atoms. Electrons are sent from one to another and share them.
~ They can bond, double bond, triple bond, etc.

The way you form a covalent bond is by getting two elements that do not have a full outer circle of valence electrons.
(Which means all except the noble gases). Then, you look at the empty spaces and use both of the elements to fill them up.
With the valence electrons that are left by themselves and stay where they are, they are called lone pairs, and stay with their element.

Thing with covalent bonding is that there are two differnet types - polar and non-polar.


Bonding of Carbon *C* and Oxygen *O*. Together they form a double bond.
Bonding of Carbon *C* and Oxygen *O*. Together they form a double bond.



Polar :: Where two different elements are combined to form a perfect outer circle.
example: Carbon *C* and Oxygen *O*







Bonding of 2 Carbons *C*. Together they from a quadruple bond.
Bonding of 2 Carbons *C*. Together they from a quadruple bond.




Nonpolar ::
Where two of the same elements are combined to form the perfect outer circle
example: Carbon *C*



Proof that it cannot form a covalent bond.
Proof that it cannot form a covalent bond.








Notice that there is one electron on Al left. That doesn't work in covalent bonds. For a covalent bond to work right, all electrons have to have a pair.
This shows that I, Aluminum, cannot form a Covalent bond because I'm a metal.








Ionic Bonding•○
There are multiple aspects to ionic bonding, but one must know what an ion is to fully understand this concept. An ion is an atom that has lost or gained one or more electrons in order to change from neutrally charged, to positive or negative. * I can form an ion. The reason I can is because to become an ion, all an atom has to do is lose or gain electrons. Depending on how many valence electrons you have, you will become one of the two types of ions.
There are two types of ion - an anion and a cation. Both, completely opposites.
An anion, (normally nonmetals), is a negatively charged ion - they gain anywhere from 1 to 3.A cation, (normally metals), is a positively charged ion - they lose anywhere from 1 to 3.

If an element has 4 valence electrons, (group 14), they are in the straight middle. They cannot decide whether to form the bond or not.

Examples of anions: oxygen, chlorine
Examples of cations: lithium, magnesium
Examples•○ (of Ionic bonds and how they are forming ions)



Bonding of Aluminum and Nitrogen.
Bonding of Aluminum and Nitrogen.


Bonding of one Aluminum and three Chlorines.
Bonding of one Aluminum and three Chlorines.

Bonding of Aluminum and Nitrogen.
Bonding of Aluminum and Nitrogen.

Metallic Bonding•○ A metallic bond is formed by the attraction between metals and metals only. Positive charged metal ions and the electrons
around them come together. In this type of bond, the electrons move freely. In this type of model, it explains different metals ability
to conduct electricity, heat, and how flexible, or malleable, the metal is.

Example:
This is what metallic bonds look like.

Bonding of Aluminum and Bismuth - they form a triple bond.
Bonding of Aluminum and Bismuth - they form a triple bond.


Friends, Please Join Me!
I cannot form any covalent bonds, so that means nonmetals are out, well, for bonding anyway.
I can form a metallic bond, so any metals can be my friend as well.
As for ionic bonds, I can be friends with any elements that are compatible with the number of electrons I have.

I'm nitrogen7 and we would make a great ionic bond. You are perfectly compatible with me so why not.